This post is the enclosing one in series of “GDS: The Evolution”.

We’re still talking about pre-Internet GDSes. In 80-s new systems like that appeared. So Delta, Trans World ans North West created GDS called Worldspan. Three years before that (in 1987) Lufthansa and Air France implemented Amadeus. Here’s the list of biggest GDSes along with actual travel commerce site that use them:

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So as we can see these days it’s different first of all because major GDS systems are open not only to travel agents but also to the end consumer. Web capabilities enrich user experience and GDS functionality allows you to build your itinerary on your own so that you don’t necessarily need travel agent to do it for you.
Alex Yakima
Paul is a software architect for Luminis Technologies and the author of “Building Modular Cloud Apps With OSGi”. He believes that modularity and the cloud are the two main challenges we have to deal with to bring technology to the next level, and is working on making this possible for mainstream software development. Today he is working on educational software focussed on personalised learning for high school students in the Netherlands. Paul is an active contributor on open source projects such as Amdatu, Apache ACE and Bndtools.