How To Choose A Car

In the past I was asked a lot of times about the same thing: how to choose a car? You like cars, you know cars, you work with cars… how to choose a car? And every time the person who was asking was unhappy with what I answer.

Each time when anybody wants to purchase a car (not only a car, but…), he does the same mistake: he wants to be objective. Car is expensive, we usually buy car for a long use, so we must do the optimal choice. And the long run becomes. What I want? Cost?Comfort?Silence?Design?Luggage capacity? Travel with family? Advanced telematics? Snazzy infotainment gear like the most advanced stereo system? Cutting edge ADAS systems? The list goes on. Many factors, many weights, lots of test drives, hours of Internet search. And one of two results: either the ‘right’ car becomes ‘wrong’ after being bought, or person buys a car which is very different from what he considers ‘optimal’, just because he likes this particular car.

The problem is modern cars are very similar. Even cars of different classes, having different engines, equipment, materials, they all are having almost the same functions and capabilities. Yes, BMW enables you with driving 250km/h, but how frequently you drive 250km/h? Yes, S-class is big and comfortable, but Hyundai Sonata is also big and… also comfortable. If you forget about the brand name and skip very minor details.

Another problem, nobody is objective when chooses a toy. Car is a toy more than for 50%, therefore all careful arguments we use are not really inline with what we want. Some of us actually buy a car for its infotainment capabilities rather than its seating capacity. Others would buy cars just to show off its advanced telematics or ADAS features. We selects one toy from a long long list of very similar toys… trying to use formal proofs of our choice. We deceive ourself.

As a result, being asked about the right way to choose a car, I always answer the same thing: take what you like. You can even buy a car in Internet, by photo, by description… no difference. You will either love or hate it and it is not depending on how accurate you are in your selection process. You should only use two simple rules: take a thing you have money for, and remember everything is relative, safety is absolute.

But. Who cares of safety before an accident?

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